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Investing, Financial, Trading and Crypto Terms - Dictionary (#)

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Investing/Finance/Trading/Crypto Dictionary
1%/10 Net 30
This is a common payment term used in business transactions. It means that the buyer must pay 1% of the total amount due within 10 days of receiving the invoice, and the remaining balance must be paid within 30 days.
10-K
A 10-K is a form that public companies are required to file with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) annually. It provides a comprehensive overview of the company's financial performance and operations over the previous fiscal year.
10-Q
A 10-Q is a form that public companies are required to file with the SEC quarterly. It provides a summary of the company's financial performance and operations over the previous quarter.
10-Year Treasury Note
A Treasury note is a debt security issued by the U.S. Department of the Treasury. A 10-year Treasury note is a debt security that matures in 10 years and pays interest to the bondholder every six months until maturity.
1040 IRS Form
The Form 1040 is the standard individual income tax return form used in the United States. It is used to report an individual's income, deductions, and credits to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).
1040A Form
The Form 1040A is a shorter version of the standard Form 1040 individual income tax return. It is used by individuals with simpler tax situations and can be used in place of the 1040 form.
1040EZ Form
The Form 1040EZ is the simplest version of the individual income tax return. It can be used by individuals with straightforward tax situations and who meet certain eligibility requirements.
11th District Cost of Funds Index (COFI)
The 11th District Cost of Funds Index (COFI) is an index used to adjust the interest rates on certain adjustable rate mortgages. It is based on the average cost of funds for savings institutions in the 11th Federal Reserve District.
12B-1 Fee
A 12b-1 fee is a type of fee charged by mutual funds to cover marketing and distribution expenses. These fees are typically assessed as a percentage of the fund's assets, and are paid out of the fund's assets on a regular basis.
183-Day Rule
The 183-day rule is a tax rule used to determine whether an individual is considered a resident or nonresident for tax purposes. Under this rule, an individual will be considered a resident for tax purposes if they are present in a country for more than 183 days during a calendar year.
30-Year Treasury
A 30-year Treasury is a debt security issued by the U.S. Department of the Treasury. It matures in 30 years and pays interest to the bondholder every six months until maturity.
51% Attack
A 51% attack is a type of attack on a blockchain network in which a group of miners control more than 50% of the mining power, allowing them to manipulate the network by reversing transactions and blocking new ones.
401(a) Plan
A 401(a) plan is a type of defined benefit retirement plan typically offered by government and non-profit employers. It is funded by employer contributions and is designed to provide a specified benefit to the employee at retirement.
401(k) Plan
A 401(k) plan is a type of defined contribution retirement plan. It is funded by employee contributions and employer matching contributions and allows employees to save for retirement on a tax-deferred basis.
403(b) Plan
A 403(b) plan is a type of tax-advantaged retirement savings plan available to employees of certain tax-exempt organizations, such as public schools, colleges, universities, and certain non-profit organizations. These plans allow employees to set aside money for retirement on a pre-tax basis, and in some cases, employer contributions are also allowed. Similar to 401(k) plans, there are limits to the amount that an employee can contribute to a 403(b) plan each year. The money invested in a 403(b) plan is not taxed until it is withdrawn, and withdrawals are subject to income taxes and may be subject to penalties if made before the age of 59 1/2.
457 Plan
A 457 plan is a type of deferred compensation retirement plan available to certain government and non-profit employees. It allows employees to set aside money for retirement on a pre-tax basis and has similar rules to 401(k) plans.
5/1 Hybrid Adjustable-Rate Mortgage (5/1 Hybrid ARM)
A 5/1 hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage is a type of mortgage that has a fixed interest rate for the first five years and then adjusts annually based on an index and margin.
501(c)(3) Organizations
501(c)(3) organizations are non-profit organizations that have been recognized by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) as tax-exempt under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. They are typically charitable, religious, educational, scientific, or literary in nature.
52-Week High/Low
The 52-week high and low refer to the highest and lowest prices that a stock has traded at over the past 52 weeks.
529 Plan
A 529 plan is a type of tax-advantaged savings plan that is specifically designed to encourage saving for future college costs. Contributions to the plan are not tax-deductible, but the investment grows tax-free, and withdrawals are tax-free when used for qualified education expenses.
8-K (Form 8-K)
Form 8-K is a report that public companies are required to file with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) within four days of certain events such as changes in management, bankruptcy, or acquisition of another company.
80-20 Rule
The 80-20 rule, also known as the Pareto principle, states that roughly 80% of the effects come from 20% of the causes.
It is often used to describe how a small number of inputs produce the majority of the outputs.
83(b) Election
An 83(b) election is a tax election available to individuals who receive restricted stock units (RSUs) or restricted stock awards (RSAs) from their employer. By making this election, the individual can choose to be taxed on the fair market value of the stock at the time it is received, rather than waiting until the stock vests. This can be beneficial if the stock is expected to increase in value.
0x Protocol
0x is an open-source, decentralized protocol that enables the peer-to-peer exchange of assets on the Ethereum blockchain. The protocol allows for the creation of decentralized exchanges (DEXs) and other decentralized applications that require the exchange of assets.
10-K Wrap
A 10-K wrap is a document that combines a company's annual 10-K filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) with additional information, such as financial statements and other disclosures that are not required by the SEC.
100% Equities Strategy
A 100% equities strategy is an investment strategy that involves holding only stocks in one's portfolio. This strategy aims to maximize returns but also comes with higher risk as the portfolio is exposed to the volatility of the stock market.
1040 U.S. Individual Tax Return Form
The Form 1040 is the standard individual income tax return form used in the United States. It is used to report an individual's income, deductions, and credits to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).
125% Loan
A 125% loan is a type of loan that allows the borrower to borrow up to 125% of the value of the collateral used to secure the loan. This can include the value of a home or other property. This type of loan is usually offered at higher interest rates than traditional loans.
12B-1 Fund
A 12b-1 fund is a type of mutual fund that charges a fee to cover the expenses of marketing and distributing the fund. These fees are typically assessed as a percentage of the fund's assets, and are paid out of the fund's assets on a regular basis.
12B-1 Plan
A 12b-1 plan is a type of mutual fund distribution plan in which a fund charges a fee to cover the expenses of marketing and distributing the fund. These fees are typically assessed as a percentage of the fund's assets, and are paid out of the fund's assets on a regular basis.
130-30 Strategy
A 130-30 strategy is an investment strategy that involves short selling stocks that the investor believes will decline in value while using the proceeds to purchase other stocks that the investor believes will appreciate in value. The goal of this strategy is to generate returns that are greater than a traditional long-only strategy.
18-Hour City
An 18-hour city is a city that has a growing economy and a relatively low cost of living, but also has a vibrant culture and a high quality of life. These cities are becoming increasingly attractive to people looking to move away from more expensive, larger cities.
2000 Investor Limit
The 2000 investor limit is the maximum number of investors allowed in a Regulation D, Rule 506 private placement.
2011 U.S. Debt Ceiling Crisis
The 2011 United States debt-ceiling crisis was a political dispute between the Obama Administration and the Congress over raising the federal government's debt limit. The crisis resulted in the passage of the Budget Control Act of 2011, which established caps on discretionary spending and created a "super committee" to make recommendations for further deficit reduction.
25% Rule
The 25% rule is an investment rule of thumb that suggests investors should not invest more than 25% of their portfolio in any one stock or sector.
3-2-1 Buydown Mortgage
A 3-2-1 buydown mortgage is a type of adjustable-rate mortgage in which the interest rate is lowered in the first three years, and then increases in the next two years, and then increases again in the last year. This type of mortgage is intended to help borrowers afford higher payments in the later years of the loan.
3-6-3 Rule
The 3-6-3 rule is a rule of thumb that states that a bank should be able to take in deposits, make loans, and turn a profit all within a three-month period. It is not a formal rule but a way of illustrating how banks used to operate.
3/27 Adjustable-Rate Mortgage (ARM)
A 3/27 adjustable-rate mortgage is a type of adjustable-rate mortgage in which the interest rate is fixed for the first three years, and then adjusts every 27 months thereafter.
3(c)(7) Exemption
The 3(c)(7) exemption is a provision in the Investment Company Act of 1940 that allows for the formation of private investment companies with a maximum of 100 investors and no more than 50 of whom are not accredited investors. These companies are not required to register with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and are exempt from certain regulatory requirements.